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Explain how radioactive and radiometric dating are related

explain how radioactive and radiometric dating are related-32

The amount of the isotope in the object is compared to the amount of the isotope's decay products.The object's approximate age can then be figured out using the known rate of decay of the isotope.

The best-known radiometric dating techniques include radiocarbon dating, potassium-argon dating, and uranium-lead dating.In these cases, the half-life of interest in radiometric dating is usually the longest one in the chain.This half-life will be the rate-limiting factor in the ultimate transformation of the radioactive nuclide into its stable daughter(s).Example of a radioactive decay chain from lead-212 (212Pb) to lead-208 (208Pb) .Each parent nuclide spontaneously decays into a daughter nuclide (the decay product) via an α decay or a β decay.Mikhail Marov of the Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry said scientists had determined the meteorite's age by observing the amount of radioactive isotopes and their decay byproducts, a technique called of a granodiorite at the Cuttaburra A prospect indicates that this mineralised system may be Middle Silurian in age and thus indicating that the host rocks are older than those hosting the Cobar-type deposits.

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. 1979, 1986 © Harper Collins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012 Cite This Source (rā'dē-ō-mět'rĭk) A method for determining the age of an object based on the concentration of a particular radioactive isotope contained within it.

Radiocarbon dating is one such type of radiometric dating.

A process for determining the age of an object by measuring the amount of a given radioactive material it contains.

The final decay product, lead-208 (208Pb), is stable and can no longer undergo spontaneous radioactive decay.

Systems that have been exploited for radiometric dating have half-lives ranging from only about 10 years (e.g., tritium) to over 100 billion years (e.g., Samarium-147).

This predictability allows the relative abundances of related nuclides to be used as a clock to measure the time it takes for the parent atom to decay into the daughter atom(s).